SEND and Inclusion

SEND Information Report 2016 balloon07

How does the education setting know if children need extra help and what should I do if I think my child may have special educational needs?

Children’s needs may be categorised into four different areas:

  • communication and interaction
  • cognition and learning
  • social, emotional and mental health
  • sensory and/or physical needs

We believe that early identification of special educational needs, whether it is social, emotional, physical, communication or a specific learning difficulty, is crucial to the wellbeing of all of our children.

Special Educational Needs are identified in the following ways:

  • Concerns from class teacher relating to limited progress or curriculum access
  • Concerns from parents / carers relating to progress or curriculum access
  • School assessment data highlighting out of step progress or attainment (3 times annually)
  • Consultation with health services regarding medically diagnosed conditions such as autism or physical difficulties impacting on curriculum access
  • Consultation with previous settings on transfer of new pupils

If parents / carers have any concerns about their child’s development or potential special educational needs, they should in the first instance speak to the class teacher. Further meetings will then be arranged with the Inclusion Manager (INCo). Official parent’s / carer’s evenings are held three times a year in terms 2, 4 and 6. However, concerned parties should not wait until then but speak to the teacher as soon as they have concerns.

As an inclusive school we do not seek to closely define the special educational needs for which we will make provision. Historically we have had success in providing for a wide range of different needs, when budget, resources and availability of expertise has allowed. This has included pupils with:

  • Dyslexia
  • Autistic Spectrum Condition
  • Dyspraxia
  • Physical Difficulties
  • Visual and Hearing Impairment

In admitting pupils with special educational needs, we would expect to have informative discussions with both the pupil’s family and the local authority to ascertain the suitability of our provision. We understand that it is initially our responsibility to make provision for a pupil with special educational needs through the school’s devolved SEN budget. Thereafter we are aware of the process of applying for High Needs Funding if the pupil’s and the school’s needs make that a necessity. As a mainstream school, it would clearly be difficult for us to make provision for pupils whose needs and/or demands are significant, severe or profound – to the extent that it could be argued that they would be most appropriately placed in a special school. However, we do not rule this out and would make a careful assessment of the needs of each pupil in constructive conversation with other agencies.

How will Air Balloon Hill Primary support my child?

When a child enters our School Support programme an assessment of need will be carried out and a plan of support put in place. This will be recorded on our ‘Graduated Response’ form and shared with parents / carers. The assignment and co-ordination of all additional support lies with the INCo, however, the face-to-face meetings with the parents and regular updates will be, in general, carried out by the class teacher. If a child has an Education Health Care plan, additional information meetings will take place between the Inclusion Manager and parents/carers.

We have a member of the governing body assigned to monitor SEND provision. They meet with the INCo regularly to challenge and support the school. The INCo reports the progress made by children with SEND to the governing body three times a year. This report contains analysis of the effectiveness of provision for children with SEND.

How will the curriculum be matched to my child’s needs?

When planning, teachers have the responsibility to make sure learning can be accessed by all members of their class, by delivering a solid wave 1 curriculum that is suitably differentiated. Additional resources are deployed where needed to make this possible. This could be in the form of additional adult support in the classroom or specialist equipment and will be planned for on a child’s graduated response document.

How will both you and I know how my child is doing and how will you help me to support my child with their learning?

The Graduated Response planning document is written with and shared with parents / carers. This contains the information explaining the additional and different support a child is receiving, how often this is happening and the practitioners involved in delivering this support.

Air Balloon Hill Primary encourage good contact levels with staff. Teachers are on hand twice a day to discuss concerns and longer appointments can be made if necessary. Where this is not possible, e.g. if a child attends breakfast or afterschool provision, a home school book or email arrangement can be set up to keep an open dialogue regarding progress. These things happen outside of our normal reporting arrangements, which happen three times a year.

If part of a child’s provision is a specific intervention such as First Class @ Number, Numberland or Reading Recovery, then a parent / carer meeting is held before starting.  In this meeting ways of supporting their children at home are fully explained. Again we welcome parents dropping in to receive updates and gain additional support when they feel they need it.

Parents / carers can book sessions with our Family Support Worker to look at ways of meeting additional needs at home.

The INCo is available to meet with parents / carers to provide updates and explore options regarding meeting children’s needs.

What support will there be for my child’s overall wellbeing?

We have the following support available, which make up our ‘Nurture Package’:

  • Family Support Worker – To work with parents providing a vital link between home and school. Individual support and parenting support groups. Helping to raise attendance of vulnerable groups.
  • Learning Mentor – Working with children and families to improve learning behaviours and curriculum access
  • 2 x Practitioners running our ‘EPIC’ scheme. This concentrates on raising self-esteem and emotional welfare.
  • Art therapist and counsellor – Working with a wide range of children with emotional and mental health needs
  • Full time Welfare team delivering on individual care plans and coordinating medicine administration and personal care. They are available to meet parents / carers daily or be contacted by phone.

What specialist services and expertise are available at or accessed by the educational setting?

We access specialist support for children as required these include:

  • Educational Psychology Service
  • Physiotherapy Service
  • Occupational Therapy Service
  • Speech and Language Therapy Service
  • Bristol Autism Team (previously ASDOT)
  • Children and Adolescent Mental Health Service
  • Paediatrician Service
  • Diabetes Nursing Service
  • Learning Improvement Service
  • Behaviour Improvement Service
  • Ethnic Minority Inclusion and Assessment Team
  • Social Care
  • Hearing and Vision Impairment Service
  • Child Counselling
  • Art Therapy

Most of these services are called in by school. They help us assess and form a plan. We then employ additional staff to help us ‘do’, then the agency is called back in to ‘review’ and re-plan.

What training are the staff supporting children with SEND had or having?

Staff access training on a rolling programme depending on the child they are working with. Over the last few years support staff received training from Dyslexia Action. The Behaviour Improvement Service provided a development package for our Nurture Team. The Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy and Hearing and Vision Impairment Services provided individual training for support staff working with sensory needs. We have an in house performance management system for support staff, which identifies needs and targets support. Last year, this included speech and language development, inference training, food hygiene, how to promote a growth mindset, behaviour improvement techniques including positive handling and diabetes training. 

How will my child be included in activities outside the classroom including trips?

We strive to make sure all trips and activities are accessible for all learners. Ratios of staff to children are adjusted to make this possible. Parents of children with specific disabilities or medical needs are consulted in the planning stages and an individual risk assessment is carried out if needed.

How accessible is the education setting?

Air Balloon Hill Primary is on a large sloping site. It is a mixture of buildings that are over 100 years old and a recently built 12 classroom block housing reception, year 1 and year 6. The classrooms are all accessible by wheelchair and there are disabled toilet facilities spaced around the school.

Acoustically, the new build is superb for children with hearing impairments. The old build however, is not, as all rooms have high vaulted ceilings. We take advice form the Hearing Improvement Team regarding seating positions of the children and any other reasonable adjustments they suggest.

Equipment to support children is often purchased directly by the school. In the case of a large piece of equipment e.g. a hoist, needed for a particular length of time, we would look to hire or loan it.

We have worked with the Ethnic Minority Inclusion and Assessment Team and created a procedure for new arrivals. We use the Bristol Translation Service for meetings and parents evenings where we need support in communicating and collecting parent’s points of view.

Every caution is taken to make sure the site is secure, however, we cannot accommodate children with high levels of behavioural needs that present as climbing, escaping or hiding, as the site is too large to guarantee their safety.

How will Air Balloon Hill Primary prepare and support my child to join their setting, transfer to a new setting or the next stage of education and life?

If a child has an Education Health Care Plan (EHCP) or significant SEN, preparation for transfer begins in year 5. Parents / carers are encouraged to visit settings and produce a short list. The Inclusion Manager then supports the decision making process by arranging additional visits, accompanying parents if required. The chosen school(s) is then invited to the year 5 annual review.

When a placement has been agreed, a transition plan is formulated on an individual basis. This includes extra visits to the setting to meet with key staff.  Children may be identified for group or individual sessions with our art therapist or nurture team to support transition.

How are Air Balloon Hill Primary’s resources allocated and matched to children’s special educational needs?

A costed provision map is produced each year to show how the school’s SEN budget is spread across the school. We target year groups and classes where progress is not at expected levels or attainment is low. The level of additional support in each year group is not uniform as it is based upon the needs of our individual cohorts.

When a child has received support in excess of £10, 000 per year and still needs a greater level of provision, then a request for additional funding can take place to help meet their needs via the TOPUP procedure. 

How is the decision made about what type and how much support my child will receive?

The decision to give a child additional support is made by measuring their distance away from age related expectations. The decision is made by the Inclusion Manager in response to concerns raised at pupil progress meetings, parents meetings or SEN review meetings. We have a wide-ranging package of interventions that have proven results to aid the acquisition of basic skills in both literacy and numeracy. These are time constrained and progress measured. Parents / carers will be informed their child is on such a programme by the class teacher or the practitioner running the intervention. Ways to support at home can also be discussed at this point.

If a child or group of children have additional learning support in class, it is because we believe they can’t effectively access the curriculum without this. Reasons for this could include communication and interaction difficulties, specific learning difficulties, social and emotional difficulties or sensory and physical needs. We recognise the well-documented studies that show additional adults in class do not lead to accelerated outcomes and therefore, we only use this approach when it is the only way to keep a child included.

If a child has a learning support assistant (LSA) they are available before and after school to meet with parents/carers to discuss learning and offer support.

The impact of these interventions are measured three times a year by the INCo. The measures of attainment and more importantly, progress are used to measure success and plan effectively.

How are parents / carers involved in the education setting? How can I be involved?

Parents / carers come into school on a daily basis in year R and 1. Throughout the rest of the school, the adults involved with their child’s education are available before and after school daily. The Inclusion Manger and Deputy Heads are also on hand to discuss any concern they may have. We encourage a close working relationship between them and school as we believe they know their child best. We consult heavily when forming care plans and meeting medical and physical needs. We understand that parenting can be a demanding job and encourage parents to access our Family Support Worker and Inclusion Manager.

Who can I contact for further information?

If a parent / carer is worried about their child they should first contact their child’s teacher or the Inclusion Manager, Mrs Knight (ask at main office).

If a parent / carer of a child with SEN is considering joining Air Balloon Hill Primary they should speak to the Inclusion Manager, who will talk to them about their child’s specific needs and how we can meet them.

The Bristol Local Offer is set out on their website  http://www.bristol.gov.uk/

Parents may also like to contact Parent Support Service at:

Supportive Parents for Special Children

(SPSC)

3rd Floor, Royal Oak House,

Royal Oak Avenue, Bristol BS1 4GB.

Web: http://www.supportiveparents.org.uk/services-in-bristol/

 

A copy of the Special Educational Needs and Inclusion Policy can be found here.

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